Dyer is the author of four novels: Paris Trance, The Search, The Colour of Memory, and Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi; two collections of essays, Anglo-English Attitudes and Working the Room; and six genre-defying titles: But Beautiful, The Missing of the Somme, Out of Sheer Rage, Yoga For People Who Can’t Be Bothered To Do It, The Ongoing Moment and Zona, about Andrei Tarkovsky’s film Stalker.

A collection of essays from the last twenty years entitled Otherwise Known as the Human Condition was published in the US in April 2011 and won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism.

His most recent book White Sands: Experiences from the Outside World was published in May 2016 (Pantheon, US; Canongate, UK).

 

This is an abridgment of a 10,000-word interview which will be published over a network of university and national literary magazines in the coming months.

 

GEOFF DYER

On the line between fact and fiction in his memoirs:

In a way, I sometimes think that it’s when the divergences from what really happened are quite small that it calls for the services of a very scrupulous and clever biographer. Certainly, the stuff you get about me from my books it’s not–how can I put it?–it’s not reliable as evidence in any court of law. I’m very conscious that I’m not under oath when I’m writing.

[...]

On his biographical writings on musicians and writers:

I remember a line from an essay of Camus where he talks about “those two thirsts without which we cannot live, by that I mean loving and admiring.” And I feel that I have zero capacity for reverence, but I have a great capacity for loving and admiring.

[...]

These are questions that interest me very much. You know there are particular times when certain books can be written, and it’s very important to realize, you really can see, Well, I should have done that back then. [...] One of the striking things about going to places, there was that brief window when I went–Oh wow, suddenly it’s going to be possible to visit Leptis Magna, the greatest Roman ruins on earth. And it turns out that was a very, very brief window.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Have you ever been tempted to write for theatre?

 

DYER

Hmmm, absolutely not. I had this stupid but not uncommon prejudice against the theater in my 20s and 30s. It was a source of, I realize now, a very stupid pride that I never went to the theater. But actually I kind of struggle with dialogue. Anyway, I have no urge to either to write for the theater. Certainly, even though I live in Los Angeles now, I’ve got no urge to write for–however much I love cinema and film–I’ve got no urge to write for or get involved in the movies. I've got absolutely no desire at all. And in terms of the dialogue, though, one thing I would say is what I loved–I mean it’s really striking when you think of the screwball comedies in the 1930s. And I just love the kind of dialogue between men and woman that you get in those films. It always seems so far ahead of its time in a way that the women are always taking the lead and they’re so... [Dyer snaps his fingers.] I just love that dialogue that you get in screwball comedies.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Yes, they were clever. They were playful and they were punning. 

 

DYER

Yeah, exactly, that’s right. They were adorable and they were just great. It seems so different to other forms of film where quite often the role of the woman was just to scream and get restless, you know?

[...]

On Zona, his book about Andrei Tarkovsky's film Stalker (1979):

The pleasing thing for me is that after writing the book I found that my admiration and love for the film was not only undiminished, it had been enhanced by my sort of increased understanding of how its effects were achieved. So I find myself just even more overwhelmed by it now. And also I think, in that instance, I've never written a book where I've wanted, wished so much to be able to add to it–almost the moment the book was published–because I kept learning other things about the film and about the issues that it addressed, things that other people told me. So my sense of understanding the film continues to grow.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Yeah, and it’s interesting because I'm thinking of some of your other books. You're inspired by film, music, photography and the ongoing moment. It seems you have this sense of wonder about other mediums. Are they inspiring to you? 

 

DYER

Inspiring? I don't know if that’s the word, but I'm certainly very interested in photography. I love looking at photographs, and I think one of the things I'd be much more interested in–you know, somebody was saying the other day that I haven't written many reviews. I don't do so much criticism anymore. And I thought, that’s sort of true, but they're interpreting criticism in a very narrow way, meaning literary criticism. And it’s true I haven't written so much about writing and books in the last couple years, but I have written an enormous amount about photography. And it’s because I think, in a way, I know quite a lot about literature now, whereas I've continued to enjoy finding out about this new area of photography that’s been really so enriching for me.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Yes, an image creates that enigma that, as you say, your curiosity can latch onto it. Tells another story, but it’s not complete. And literature is a domain you know very well. 

 

DYER

Yeah, that’s right, whereas photography is so mysterious to me, and I've always been drawn to things [like that]. And music is so mysterious to me, and that’s what was going on with the jazz book But Beautiful... You know, God, the way that these people create music, it was–because I've got no understanding of music–and it was really very mysterious to me.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Yeah, I liked the voices which emerged in that book. You wrote great portraits of Chet Baker, Duke Ellington and others. You wrote about Duke Ellington, you said, “everything he encountered found its way into his music,” and that made me think of you because in your writing, you're putting up a mirror to yourself while you’re writing about these other artists.

Portrait of geoff dyer by mia funk. excerpt from But Beautiful, A Book About Jazz. 

Portrait of geoff dyer by mia funk. excerpt from But Beautiful, A Book About Jazz. 

I was surprised by your book because I didn’t know their biographies, although I painted a big portrait for the 30th anniversary of the Guinness Jazz Festival featuring many of the jazz musicians you wrote about, but I didn't know their life stories.

 

DYER

Yeah, I mean back when I wrote the book in the late 1980s and early 90s there wasn't so much stuff available, but so many biographies have come out about those figures now. So, for example, Thelonious Monk, I mean really there are lots of anecdotes about him. And there was that great film by Charlotte Zwerin. But ah, you know the great Robin Kelley biography was only published about four or five years ago, so a lot more biographical material is available now, both in print and on the Internet than was the case back when I wrote the book. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

But, even without knowing all the biographical detail, you've imagined yourself into their lives, whether the facts are true or not. Reading it I felt a real sense of ahhh––I can't say that I've really read a lot of books about music that made me hear music, made me see music. I felt your admiration and respect for their form; it was like a poem. The whole book read like a poem. 

 

DYER

I think that was the idea, really, because you know I was so interested in these musicians and the music they made. But because I had no understanding of, or ability to, write about music in musical terms, the only way to do it was to invent these themes, and it seems that people did really respond to that. And also, there is a bit in the new book where I talk about the way I've become interested in Albert Ayler lately, and I thought I might try to write something about Albert Ayler pretty much in the style of But Beautiful. And so when we were living in Williamsburg I took the East River Ferry, and it’s all in the new book, hoping I could maybe write something. And then just gone...you know that stuff that I was really able to do quite easily in my early 30s in But Beautiful, back in 1989 and 1990, it's just gone now. I just can't  do it. You know I sort of regret now that I didn't really include a chapter about Albert Ayler back then when I was capable of writing it. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Oh, I'm sorry. I'm sure you could, I think you've just…

 

DYER

No, I'm sure I couldn't. I really couldn't. The number of hours I've spent with my notebook and my Walkman with Albert Ayler tracks playing in my head. I just couldn't sum it up in spirit the way I was very easily able to summon up the spirit of these other jazz musicians. But, you know, it’s quite a thing with the writing life when you do it over a long period of time. You realise that you gain some things, but–oh my God–you lose them. You lose a lot of other things along the way, too. 

[...]

On his new book, White Sands, in which all the pieces take place outdoors:

There's a piece in White Sands about my time in a sailboat in the Arctic Circle. The original piece was only 1,000 words and this was kind of 8,000 words in the book. And then there's some new pieces with linking passages, so it becomes again a new kind of book. A book with it's own distinct forms. So it has, although it is a collection of disparate pieces, a kind of overarching narrative to it, or so I think. And it was going to be called–I forget now exactly the title of that Gauguin painting?– Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? And everybody said that was a silly title, so finally I came to my senses and now it's called White Sands. And then the subtitle is Experiences from the Outside World, derived from that essay by D.H. Lawrence about New Mexico where he says New Mexico is "the greatest experience of the outside world" that he's ever had.

With special thanks to Lethokuhle Msimang for editorial assistance.

Selected translations from the Sorbonne Preview of The Creative Process:

Dyer est l’auteur de quatre romans, Paris Trance, The Search, Couleur du souvenir, Voir Venise, mourir à Varanasi, et deux ensembles d’essais, Anglo-English Attitudes et Working the Room; et six titres qui défient les lois du genre, Jazz impro, The Missing of the Somme, Out of Sheer Rage, Yoga For People Who Can’t Be Bothered To Do It, The Ongoing Moment et Zona, à propos du film Stalker, d’Andrei Tarkovsky.

Une série d’essais de ces vingt dernières années, appelée Otherwise Known as the Human Condition, a été publiée aux Etats-Unis en avril 2011, et a remporté le prix de la critique, le « National Book Critics Circle Award ».

Another Great Day at Sea: Life Aboard the USS George H.W. Bush est paru en mai 2014 (aux éditions Pantheon pour les USA, et chez Visual Editions pour le Royaume-Uni). Un nouveau livre, White Sands, a été publié en mai 2016 (chez Pantheon pour les USA, et Canongate au Royaume-Uni).

 

GEOFF DYER

Entre faits réels et fiction, dans ses mémoires:

D’une certaine manière, j’ai parfois l’impression que c’est quand la séparation avec ce qui se passe réellement est tellement fine, que cela requiert les services d’un biographe très intelligent et scrupuleux. Il est probable que ce que vous tirez de mes livres à propos de moi n’est pas – comment dire ? – fiable, dans le cadre d’un tribunal. Je suis vraiment conscient que je ne suis pas sous serment lorsque j’écris.

 

Dans ses écrits biographiques sur des écrivains et musiciens:

Je me souviens d’une citation d’un essai de Camus, dans laquelle il parle des « ces deux désirs sans lesquels nous ne pouvons vivre, par cela j’entends aimer et admirer. » Et je sens que je n’ai aucun talent pour la vénération mais que j’ai de grandes capacités pour ce qui est de l’amour et de l’admiration.

 

Voici des questions qui m’intéressent beaucoup. Vous savez qu’il y a des moments particuliers où certains livres peuvent être écrits, et il est capital de prendre conscience de cela, on peut vraiment le voir. Et bien, voilà, j’aurais dû le faire à l’époque. […] Une des choses qui frappe en se rendant aux différents endroits, c’était cette brève période d’opportunités quand je suis arrivée – Ca alors ! Il est soudain envisageable de visiter Leptis Magna, les plus belles ruines romaines sur terre. Et il s’est avéré que ce fût vraiment un créneau de liberté très bref. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Avez-vous déjà été tenté d’écrire pour le théâtre ?

 

GEOFF DYER

Non, absolument pas. J’ai eu ce préjugé stupide mais peu commun envers le théâtre, entre mes vingt et mes trente ans. C’était, j’en ai conscience, une fierté stupide que de ne jamais être allé au théâtre. Mais ce type de lutte par le dialogue… Bref, je n’ai pas eu l’envie irrépressible d’écrire pour le théâtre. Bien entendu, malgré que je vive à Los Angeles à présent, je n’ai pas ressenti l’envie de travailler sur ce domaine – j’adore pourtant le cinéma – et je n’ai pas besoin d’écrire pour me sentir engagée dans les films. Non, je n’en ressens vraiment ni l’envie ni le besoin. Et en termes de dialogue, bien que je veuille dire que c’est ce que j’aimais, il est aussi vraiment intéressant de penser aux comédies farfelues des années 1930. Et j’aime cette sorte de dialogue entre homme et femme qu’on peut voir dans ces films. Ça semble toujours si lointain par rapport à aujourd’hui, notamment dans le sens où les femmes dirigent toujours, et sont tellement… Oui, j’aime simplement les dialogues présents dans ces comédies loufoques. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Oui, ces comédies étaient intelligentes, enjouées et pleines de jeux de mots !

 

DYER

Exactement, c’est vrai. Elles étaient adorables et simplement géniales. Cela semble si différent des autres médiums, ou même des films, où le rôle de la femme se limitait à crier et être tourmentée.

 

À propos son livre Zona, à propos du film Stalker, d’Andrei Tarkovsky (1979) : 

Quelque chose qui a été agréable pour moi, c’est lorsqu’ après avoir écrit le livre, j’ai découvert que mon admiration et mon amour pour le film, non seulement étaient intact mais se retrouvaient accentués par ma compréhension accrue de la manière dont ces effets sont exploités. Je me retrouve donc encore plus submergé par ça, maintenant. Je crois aussi, dans ce cas, n’avoir jamais écrit de livre au point où je le voulais, j’espérais vraiment être capable d’apporter des éléments supplémentaires au livre, au dernier moment avant sa publication, car je ne cesse d’apprendre d’autres choses à propos du film ou bien des problèmes qu’il soulève. Des choses que d’autres personnes me disent. Ma compréhension du film continue ainsi de croître.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Oui, c’est intéressant parce que je pense aussi à quelques-uns de vos autres livres. Vous vous inspirez du cinéma, de la musique, de la photographie et du moment présent. Il semble que vous ayez ce sens de l’attirance vers les autres médiums. Sont-ils inspirants pour vous ?

 

DYER

Inspirants ? Je ne sais pas si c’est le mot, mais il est certain que la photographie m’intéresse beaucoup, j’aime regarder des photographies et je pense qu’elles font partie des choses qui m’intéressent le plus… Vous savez, quelqu’un a dit l’autre jour que je n’avais pas écrit beaucoup de critiques. Il est vrai que je ne le fait plus autant qu’avant. J’ai alors pensé que c’était vrai, d’une certaine manière, mais qu’ils interprétaient la critique de manière très restreinte, dans le sens littéral de la critique. Il est vrai que je n’ai pas écrit beaucoup à propos de la littérature ces dernières années, mais j’ai écrit énormément de choses sur la photographie. C’est parce que je considère que j’en sais beaucoup sur la littérature à présent, tandis que je continue à apprécier découvrir des choses sur ce nouveau domaine qu’est la photographie. C’est réellement enrichissant pour moi. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Oui, une image crée cette énigme à laquelle comme vous le dites, votre curiosité peut s’accrocher. Cela raconte une autre histoire, mais qui est incomplète. Et puis la littérature est un domaine que vous connaissez très bien.

 

DYER

Oui, c’est vrai, bien que la photographie soit si mystérieuse pour moi… Et que j’ai toujours été attiré par des choses comme celle-ci. La musique, aussi, est si mystérieuse pour moi ; c’est ce qui s’est passé avec mon livre sur le jazz, But Beautiful… Ah, vous savez ! La manière dont ces gens créent de la musique, c’était… parce que, vous voyez, je ne comprenais rien à la musique et c’était vraiment mystérieux pour moi.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Oui, j’ai bien aimé les voix qui émergeaient de ce livre. Vous avez écrits de superbes portraits de Chet Baker, Duke Ellington… A propos de Duke Ellington, vous avez dit « tout ce qu’il découvrait se retrouvait dans sa musique » et cela m’a fait penser à vous puisque, dans vos écrits, vous tendez un miroir devant vous pendant que vous écrivez à propos de ces autres artistes.

 

Il devrait atteindre le point où, virtuellement, tout ce qu’il rencontre intègre sa musique – une géographie personnelle de la terre, une biographie comme un orchestre des couleurs, sons, odeurs, nourritures et des gens – tout ce qu’il a ressenti, touché et vu…

C’était comme être l’écrivain d’un mot dans le son – et ce sur quoi il travaillait était une colossale fiction musicale qui en a toujours fait partie et qui portait en fin de compte sur elle-même, à propos du mec dans un groupe qui en jouait.

[But Beautiful, A Book About Jazz par Geoff Dyer]

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

J’ai été surprise par votre livre parce que je ne connaissais pas les biographies de ceux dont vous parlez, même si j’avais peint un grand portrait pour le 30e anniversaire du Guinness Jazz Festival, où figuraient beaucoup des musiciens de jazz à propos desquels vous avez écrit. Mais je ne connaissais pas l’histoire de leur vie.

DYER

Ouais, je veux dire, quand j’ai écrit le livre à la fin des années 1980 et au début des années 1990, il n’y avait pas beaucoup de matériel disponible. Mais beaucoup de biographies sont sorties à propos de ces personnages maintenant. Par exemple, Thelonius Monk. Je veux dire, il y a beaucoup d’anecdotes sur lui. Et il y a eu ce film génial de Charlotte Zwerin. Mais la biographie géniale de Robert Kelley a été publiée il y a seulement quatre ou cinq ans, donc beaucoup plus d’éléments biographiques sontdisponibles maintenant, sur papier et sur internet, que quand j’ai écrit le livre.

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Mais même sans savoir tous les détails biographiques, vous vous êtes imaginés dans leurs vies, que les faits soient vrais ou pas. En le lisant, j’ai senti un vrai sens de « aah » (je dois dire qu’il n’y a pas beaucoup de livres sur la musique qui m’ont fait entendre de la musique, qui m’ont fait voir de la musique.) Je sentais votre respect et votre admiration pour eux : c’était comme un poème. Tout le livre est comme un poème en fait.

DYER

Je pense que c’était l’idée vraiment, parce que vous savez, j’étais si intéressée par ces musiciens et la musique qu’ils font. Mais parce que je n’avais aucune compréhension, ou aucune capacité à écrire sur la musique avec des termes de musique, le seul moyen de le faire était d’inventer ces thèmes et il m’a semblé que les gens ont vraiment réagi à ça. Et même si c’est approximatif, il y a une partie dans mon nouveau livre où j’explique comment je suis devenue intéressée par Albert Ayler récemment, et je pensais que j’allais peut-être essayer d’écrire quelque chose à propos de lui. Vous savez, un peu dans le style de But Beautiful, et donc quand on vivait à Williamsburg, j’ai pris le EastRiver Ferry (tout ça est dans le livre) en espérant que je pourrais peut-être essayer d’écrire quelque chose. Et là, c’était parti… vous savez cette chose que j’étais capable de faire plutôt facilement quand j’avais 30 ans, dans But Beautiful, en 1989 et 1990. Ca a disparu maintenant, je ne peux simplement plus le faire. Vous savez, je regrette un peu maintenant de ne pas avoir inclus un chapitre sur Albert Ayler quand j’étais capable de l’écrire.

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Oh, je suis désolée… Je suis sûre que vous pourriez, je pense que vous avez juste…

DYER

Non, je suis sûre que je ne pourrais pas. Le nombre d’heures que j’ai passées avec mon carnet et mon walkman, avec les titres d’Albert Ayler dans la tête. Je ne pouvais simplement pas en résumer l’esprit comme je l’avais fait si simplement pour les autres jazzmen. Mais vous savez, c’est quelque chose, la vie d’écrivain, quand vous le faite pendant longtemps. Vous réalisez que vous gagnez certaines choses, mais (oh mon Dieu), vous en perdez. Vous perdez beaucoup d’autres choses sur le chemin aussi.


[Dyer fait sans cesse des expériences avec la forme. Dans son nouveau livre White Sands toute l’œuvre se passe à l’extérieur.]

 

DYER

Il y a une partie dans White Sands à propos du temps que j’ai passé sur un voilier dans le Cercle Arctique. Le premier jet faisait seulement 1000 mots puis c’est [devenu] 8 000 mots dans le livre. Et puis il y a eu des ajouts avec des passages de transition, donc c’est encore devenu un autre genre de livre. Un livre avec ses propres formes distinctes. Donc il a, même s’il s’agit d’une collection de morceaux disparates, une sorte de récit englobant, ou du moins c’est ce que je pense. Et on allait m’appeler – je ne me souviens plus du titre exact- de cette peinture de Gauguin : D’où venons-nous ? … Où allons-nous ? Mais tout le monde m’a dit que c’était un titre absurde, donc je me suis finalement ressaisi et maintenant il s’appelle White Sands. Le sous-titre est : Experiences with the Outside World, dérivé de cet essai de D.H. Lawrence à propos du Nouveau Mexique où il dit que le Nouveau Mexique est « la plus grande expérience du monde extérieur » qu’il a jamais eu.

Traduit de l’anglais par Lilas Cuby, Lou Churin et Olivia Reulier