Marie Darrieussecq was born in 1969 in Bayonne, France. Her debut novel, Pig Tales was published in thirty-four countries. Five other novels have also been translated into English including A Brief Stay with the Living, Tom Is Dead and All the Way. Marie Darrieussecq lives in Paris with her husband and children. For her most recent novel, Men, she won the prestigious Prix Médicis.

Excerpt of an interview to be published across a network of university and national literary magazines in the coming months.

IMAGE, LANDSCAPE AND ABSENCES

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

I find one of the striking things about your writing is the use of intense imagery paired closely with psychology and the experiences of women, and this is something that appeals to me very much as a painter. I feel when I am reading your books I am learning to see on a deeper level and noticing all these layers and subtleties of experience that I had not noticed before. (I am thinking of My Phantom Husband and A Brief Stay With the Living.) It seems like an extraordinary challenge to write about absence and silence with such nuance and scrutiny...

MARIE DARRIEUSSECQ

As a writer, I am not satisfied with sentences such as “I was feeling very anxious” or “she felt overcome with joy”. I want readers to experience anguish, joy, feelings and events. I also want them to feel mounting tension or suspense. I believe that following a narrative is a very intense experience, immersive on a mental as well as on the physical level. Reading is for me just as powerful as writing. I spend three hours a day reading, the rest of the time writing, and in between I try to live in the best way I can.

So I believe my writing is metaphoric by nature. Anguish, for instance, is a very common experience that can deeply alter vision, hearing, even one’s sense of smell and balance… The main character in My Phantom Husband sees the molecules of the wall dissolving, for instance. Or the lamp hanging from the ceiling, she sees the disruption of its verticality. I have always, in my private life, loved scientists and they brought me a huge reservoir of images. Quantum physics is very novelistic, for example. Or the Fermi paradox. And I read a lot of science fiction during my adolescence. 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Yes, maybe that’s why. Your books immediately call up so many images. I can tell you, it’s rare I put down a book and immediately see paintings I want to make from it.

DARRIEUSSECQ

Painting is also a field where I feel confortable, painting and photography more than music, which affects my mood too much and that I tend to avoid, sadly. I always say that when I am old, I will have the strength and the wisdom necessary to listen to music… But when it comes to painting, it calms me and brings me so much knowledge about the world. Twombly, Rothko, Dubuffet, had a great influence on my writing. Giacometti as well, and his writing. Louise Bourgeois, and her writing. Or the pictures of Charles Freger. Gilles Aillaud’s paintings also helped me a lot to think about the vision of animals. Tacita Dean is also someone I find very inspiring.

The videos of Peter Fischli and David Weiss. And many artists who work with geography and maps, such as Aleghiero Boetti. It is possible to have a very subtle political discourse using the cartographic imagery of the planet. In my office, I also live with a picture by Francesca Woodman, pictures of bedrooms by Bernard Faucon, a Punu mask, a mask from Congo, statuettes from various African countries. And a painting from the Mozambican painter Bucheca representing an owl. I am currently involved in organizing an exhibition of Paula Modersohn Becker’s work (at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la ville de Paris, April-August 2016) for which I wrote her biography. I want to make her work more known in France. I see myself as a ferryman in the art world. (I often write for Beaux Arts Magazine and ArtReview.)

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

This is perhaps in contrast to a tendency in Anglo Saxon literature to separate image from character, story from idea and metaphor. In many of your books, but notably White and Précisions sur les vagues, concept and character combine into an agreeable flow…

DARRIEUSSECQ

In any case, I cannot live without images and in my mind there is a clear bridge between the visual image and the written image. For me, image or the metaphor is translated into language through the rhythm of the text. A book has its own music, its own harmony, its own sounds. It’s units of sound allow images to emerge. There is a cliché that the Anglo Saxon literature is primarily concerned with ideas, while European (or French) literature is primarily concerned with words. Of course, it’s possible to be concerned with both. Anglophones are supposedly storytellers and ‘the others’ more like poets, craftsmen, workers of the word. It seems to me that the book market privileges the story and English language greatly, so both are combined to create book-products, deprived of images and metaphors, which are perceived as ‘boring’, or ‘a waste of time.’ It’s a shame. Language is not a transparent material, however, it is the only artistic material that belongs to everyone. The artist writer must polish her material, extract the common good, work on it. Writing and reading take a lot of time, but it’s a time which dissolves, which gets forgotten, which becomes life. It’s not a pause in life, it is somehow an augmentation of the flow of life – increased reality.

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

There are so many things I want to ask you. We could spend a whole interview talking about your art writing or discussing writers inspired by images and those inspired by music. But I suppose a natural question to ask you is about your experience with a medium which combines the two: film...

DARRIEUSSECQ

I will never direct a film, unlike some of my writer friends who are at times weary of the solitude of writing and its relative lack of public impact. I can’t direct a team, I don’t want to negotiate with producers, etc. I want to remain alone, and when I need a special effect or a crowd of extras, I write them. However, my last novel tells the story of exactly that, the filming of movie from Hollywood to the Cameroon forest, passing through Paris. And I had discussions with producers, actors, film-editors… An actress friend told me: “To exercise your talent, you only need yourself. I have to wait for a phone call.” The wait an actress experiences redoubles the amorous expectation that we all experience… A life of waiting… A Madame Bovary kind of life… I find waiting very novelistic... Watching actors waiting on a film set is like watching the sea.

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

I'd read that Pig Tales had been optioned by Godard.

DARRIEUSSECQ

Jean-Luc Godard bought the novel rights as soon as it came out, in September 1996. We started working together. I was very impressed, too young. He showed me his Histoires du cinéma, in his house, pacing back and forth in the hallway smoking cigars… He wanted to adapt the novel into a kind of animation, like Alice in Wonderland… This idea pleased me a lot. He even wanted me to play in the film – I wasn’t quite sure how to take that... And then he disappeared for several months. When he came back, he told me, with his Swiss accent: “ I was playiiing tenniiiisss”. He probably had a breakdown. And he moved to another film, Eloge de l’amour. Later, he declared to the magazine Lire, with great elegance, that Pig Tales was “too good a book” to be adapted into a film, that it didn’t lack anything. After that, the bar was set so high for me that I refused other projects. Maybe it’s a book that can’t be adapted. The subjective narrative point of view is so important, so ironic, that a film would necessarily be very different from the book.

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

And do you think this experience of film and theater influenced your subsequent novels?

DARRIEUSSECQ

I was born in a provincial village. The closest cinema would show Terminator or Pierre Richard’s films. When I was around 18 and moved ‘up to’ Bordeaux, I experienced my first cinematographic shock: Husbands by Cassavettes, in the city’s film club. It opened up new horizons in my brain. My fist non-figurative painting did the same thing (it must have been a Kandinsky). So you weren’t obliged to tell "profitable" stories on the aesthetic level then. You could spend twenty minutes filming drunken people in their forties singing. You didn’t have to represent sensory experiences on only the narrative, chronological or figurative level. Then reading Claude Simon freed me from necessary transitions or adhering to the internal consistency of a single subject. And then a brief experience with drugs had the same kind of liberating effect – ether. I stopped before it completely destroyed my brain, but not before having access to new dimensions and to the certainty that our five senses only show us one version among others of the world. It is through this that I became interested in animal perception, these creatures who also have their view of the world. Their own kind of cinema, if you like.

I’ve written some theatre. I often work with a talented director, Arthur Nauzyciel. But I consider that I’m not yet at the point of excelling; I’m still learning. A sentence written for the stage is not at all the same as a sentence written for a novel.

Translated from French by Mia Funk and Dominique Carlini Versini

 

IMAGE, PAYSAGE ET ABSENCES

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

J’ai trouvé que la chose la plus étonnante à propos de votre manière d’écrire est l’usage d’un imaginaire intense allant étroitement de pair avec la psychologie et les expériences des femmes, et c’est quelque chose qui me plaît beaucoup en tant que peintre. Quand je lis vos livres, je sens que j’apprends à voir en profondeur et à remarquer toutes ces couches et subtilités de l’expérience que je n’avais pas remarquées auparavant. (Je pense à Naissance des fantômes et à Bref séjour chez les vivants). Cela paraît être un défi extraordinaire d’écrire à propos de l’absence et du silence avec autant de nuance et par un examen aussi minutieux … 

 

MARIE DARRIEUSSECQ

Comme écrivaine, je ne peux pas me satisfaire de phrases comme « je me sentais très angoissée » ou « elle fut submergée de joie ". Je veux faire sentir l’angoisse, la joie, les sentiments, les événements, aux lecteurs/trices. Je veux aussi leur faire sentir la montée d’une tension ou d'un suspens. Il me semble que suivre une narration est une expérience mentale très forte, immersive, avec une incorporation et des phénomènes physiques. Lire pour moi c’est aussi fort qu’écrire. Je passe au moins trois heures par jour à écrire, le reste du temps à écrire, et entre les deux je vis comme je peux. 

Donc mon écriture est métaphorique par nature, je crois. L’angoisse, par exemple, est une expérience très banale qui peut altérer profondément la vision, l’ouïe, même l’odorat, l’équilibre corporel… Le personnage de My Phamton Husband voit les molécules du mur se dissoudre, par exemple. Ou la lampe pendre du plafond avec une modification de la verticalité. J’ai toujours, dans ma vie privée, aimé les scientifiques et ils m’ont apporté un énorme réservoir d’images. La physique quantique est très romanesque, par exemple. Ou le paradoxe de Fermi. Et j’ai lu beaucoup de science fiction dans mon adolescence. 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Oui c’est peut-être pour cela. Vos livres font immédiatement appel à tellement d’images. Je vous le dis, il est rare que je pose un livre et que je vois immédiatement les peintures que je veux en tirer.

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

La peinture est aussi un domaine où je me sens bien, la peinture et la photo, plus que la musique, qui affecte trop mon humeur et que j’ai tendance, hélas, à éviter. Je me dis toujours que quand je serai vieille, j’aurai la force et la sagesse qui me sont nécessaires pour écouter de la musique… mais face à une peinture je peux rester calme et elle m’apporte énormément en savoir sur le monde. Twombly, Rothko, Dubuffet, ont eu une grande influence sur mon écriture. Giacometti aussi, et ses écrits. Louise Bourgeois, et ses écrits. Ou les photos de Charles Freger. Les peintures de Gilles Aillaud m’ont aussi beaucoup aidée à réfléchir au regard animal. Tacita Dean est aussi quelqu’un que je trouve très inspirante. "

Tacita Dean est aussi quelqu’un que je trouve très inspirante. Les videos de Peter Fischli et David Weiss. Et beaucoup d’artistes qui travaillent la géographie et les cartes, comme Aleghiero e Boetti. On peut avoir un discours politique très subtil en passant par l’imagerie cartographique de la planète. Je vis aussi, dans mon bureau, avec une photo de Francesca Woodman, des photos de chambres de Bernard Faucon, un masque punu, un masque du Congo, des statuettes de divers pays d’Afrique. Et un tableau du peintre mozambicain Bucheca, représentant une chouette. Je participe en ce moment au montage d'une exposition de Paula Modersohn Becker (au Musée d’art Moderne de la ville de Paris, avril-août 2016) , dont j’écris aussi la biographie. Je veux la faire connaître en France. Je me vois comme une passeuse dans le monde de l’art. (J’écris d’ailleurs souvent dans Beaux Arts Magazine et Artreview). 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

C’est peut-être par contraste avec une tendance dans la littérature anglo-saxonne qui sépare l’image du personnage, l’histoire de l’idée et de la métaphore. Dans la plupart de vos livres, mais notamment dans White et Précisions sur les vagues, le concept et le personnage se combinent dans un flux agréable.

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

En tous cas je ne peux pas vivre sans images et il y a dans ma tête une passerelle évidente entre les images plastiques et les images écrites. Pour moi l’image, ou la métaphore, se traduisent en langue par le rythme. Un livre a sa propre musique, sa propre harmonie, ses propres sons. C’est une unité sonore qui fait émerger des images. Un cliché veut que la littérature anglo saxonne travaille d’abord avec les idées, quand la littérature européenne (ou française) travaille d’abord avec les mots. Evidemment on peut travailler avec les deux. Les anglophones seraient davantage des story tellers et les « autres » davantage des poètes, des travailleurs du mot. Il me semble surtout que le marché du livre favorise la story et, immensément, l’anglais, du coup les deux se combinent pour fabriquer des produits-livres, dénués d’images et de métaphores, perçus comme « ennuyeux », ou « une perte de temps ». C’est dommage. La seule phrase intéressante c’est celle qui résiste un peu, à vrai dire c’est celle qu’on doit relire. La langue n’est pas un matériau transparent, en revanche c’est le seul matériau artistique qui appartienne absolument à tout le monde. L’artiste écrivain doit fourbir son matériau, l’extraire du bien commun, le travailler.  Ecrire et lire prennent beaucoup de temps mais c’est un temps qui se dissout, qui s’oublie, qui devient la vie. Ce n’est pas une encoche dans la vie, c’est une sorte d’augmentation du flux de vie - de la réalité augmentée. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Il y a tellement de questions que je voudrais vous poser. Nous pourrions passer tout l’entretien à parler de votre art d’écrire ou à discuter à propos d’écrivains inspirés par les images et de ceux inspirés par la musique. Mais j’imagine que la question qu’on doit naturellement vous poser est celle à propos de votre expérience du medium qui combine les deux : le film

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

Je ne tournerai jamais de film, contrairement à certains amis écrivains qui en ont assez de la solitude de l’écriture, et parfois de son relatif manque d’impact public. Je ne peux pas diriger d’équipe, je ne veux pas négocier avec un producteur, etc. Je veux rester seule, et quand j’ai besoin d’un effet spécial ou d’une foule de figurants, je les écris. En revanche, mon dernier roman racontait justement le tournage d’un film, de Hollywood à la forêt camerounaise en passant par Paris. Et je m’étais entretenue avec des producteurs, des acteurs, des monteurs… Une amie actrice m’avait dit : « toi, pour exercer ton talent, tu n’as besoin que de toi-même. Moi, je dois attendre un coup de fil ». L’attente des actrices redouble l’attente amoureuse que nous connaissons tous… Une vie d’attente… Une vie à la Madame Bovary… Je trouve l’attente très romanesque… regarder les acteurs attendre, sur un plateau de tournage, c’est comme regarder la mer. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Et Jean Luc Godard a acheté les droits du Truismes...

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

Jean Luc Godard a acheté les droits du roman dès sa sortie, en septembre 1996. Nous avons commencé à travailler ensemble. J’étais très impressionnée, trop jeune. Il m’a montré ses Histoires du cinéma, chez lui, en faisant les cent pas dans le couloir et en fumant des cigares… Pour adapter le roman il voulait aller vers le dessin animée, et Alice au pays des merveilles… ça me plaisait beaucoup. Il voulait même que je joue dedans – ça, je ne savais pas trop comment le prendre… Et puis il a disparu, plusieurs mois. Quant il a réaparru, il m’a dit, avec son accent suisse : « j’ai jouééé au tenniiiisss ». Il avait probablement fait une dépression. Et il est passé à un autre film, Eloge de l’amour. Plus tard, il a déclaré au magazine Lire, avec beaucoup d’élégance, que Truismes était un « trop bon livre » pour être adapté au cinéma, qu’il ne lui manquait rien. Après ça, la barre a été mise tellement haut pour moi que j’ai refusé d’autres projets. C’est peut-être un livre inadaptable. Le point de vue narratif, subjectif, est tellement important, tellement ironique, qu’un film serait forcément très différent du livre.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Et pensez-vous que cette expérience du film et du théâtre a influencé vos romans ultérieurs ?

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

Je suis née en province, dans un village. Le cinéma le plus proche montrait Terminator et des films de Pierre Richard. Quand je suis « montée » à Bordeaux, vers 18 ans, j’ai eu mon premier choc cinématographique : Husbands, de Cassavettes, dans le ciné club de la ville. Ça m’a ouvert de nouvelles cases du cerveau. Mon premier tableau non figuratif a agi de la même façon (ça devait être un Kandisky).  On n’était donc pas obligé.e de raconter des histoires « rentables » sur le plan esthétique. On pouvait passer vingt minutes à filmer des quadragénaires ivres qui chantent. On pouvait ne pas représenter l’expérience sensorielle sur le seul plan narratif, chronologique ou figuratif. Ensuite la lecture de Claude Simon m’a libérée des transitions obligatoires, ou de la cohérence interne d’un seul sujet. Et puis une courte expérience avec la drogue a eu le même genre d’effet libérateur– l’éther. J’ai arrêté avant que ça ne détruise complètement mon cerveau, mais pas avant d’avoir eu accès à de nouvelles dimensions, et à la certitude que nos cinq sens ne nous montrent qu’une version parmi d’autres du monde. C’est par ce biais que je me suis intéressée à la vision des animaux, ces êtres qui posent eux aussi un regard sur le monde. Leur cinéma à eux, en quelque sorte. 

Le théâtre, j’en ai écrit, un peu. Je travaille souvent avec un metteur en scène talentueux, Arthur Nauzyciel. Mais je considère que je ne suis pas encore au point. J’apprends. Une phrase écrite pour la scène n’est pas du tout une phrase de roman.

 

TRUISMES ET ZOO

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Mais je voudrais retourner au sujet que vous avez mentionné, la vision des animaux. C'est quelque chose vous avez mentionné dans votre livre de nouvelles, Zoo, et aussi dans votre premier roman, Truismes. Pouvez-vous parler un peu de ces deux livres et ce qui vous a inspiré pour les écrire? Avez-vous cherché à ébranler les lecteurs?

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

Prenez les rêves, les animaux sauvages, et les étoiles. Ces trois choses ont un point commun : elles existent. Un autre point commun : on les oublie. Les rêves existent en nous. Les animaux sauvages existent à côté de nous. Les étoiles existent au-dessus de nous. On les oublie parce que ce serait le bazar, si on y pensait. Si on prenait au sérieux la réalité des rêves. La réalité des étoiles. La réalité des bêtes sauvages.

Les étoiles : en ville on ne les voit pas. On peut continuer à vaquer. Sinon il faudrait se souvenir qu’on est sur une planète très petite, au bord d’un ruban de Voie Lactée, même pas en son centre.

Les animaux sauvages : les renards dans Paris. Les cerfs, pas très loin. Plus au large, les rorquals bleus. Si l’on se souvient qu’en ce moment même, un des derniers pangolins de la planète est en train de creuser son terrier au fond de la forêt du Congo, et qu’il envisage son monde, et y trace ses propres trajets, quelque chose en nous se décentre. Notre espace en est légèrement modifié.  Comme dit Jean-Christophe Bailly, les animaux posent eux aussi un regard sur le monde. Les arbres n’ont pas d’yeux. Les animaux partagent ça avec nous : ils regardent le monde. Ce regard, je ne comprends pas qu’on ne s’y intéresse pas, et qu’on veuille en disposer, comme si les animaux étaient des objets consommables et productibles à l’infini.  Il reste 20 000 lions et 5000 tigres sur la planète. Je ne suis pas dans une vision sentimentale de l’animal . je dis juste que quand le dernier lion aura disparu, notre identification phallique, et millénaire, à cet animal (du moins chez les hommes) ne sera plus que de l’ordre d’une étrange mémoire. Quand le dernier éléphant aura disparu, il nous manquera. Le tigre de Tasmanie nous manque. On ne sait pas encore à quel point une planète dénuée d’animaux sauvages nous sera, métaphysiquement, déserte.

Cette absence programmée m’évoque celle des rêves. On les oublie. Parce que c’est trop. Parce qu’ils sont en trop. Derrida : « nous menons une guerre totale aux animaux ». Je ne suis pas loin de penser qu’on fait la même chose pour les rêves, et que si on pouvait, les étoiles y passeraient aussi.  

Tous mes livres parlent de ça. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Et ainsi qu'un écrivain, vous êtes aussi un traducteur - bien, vous êtes aussi un psychanalyste, ce qui est quelque chose dont j'espère nous pourrons parler plus tard - mais vous êtes un traducteur qui a abordé quelques-uns des écrivains les plus difficiles dans la langue anglaise, Virginia Woolf et James Joyce. Qu'avez-vous découvert à travers ce processus et comment diriez-vous l'acte de traduction a donné forme à votre pratique créative?

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

Traduire c’est prendre conscience qu’il y a un « résidu » intraduisible entre les langues. Et c’est probablement dans cet espace que se déploie l’indicible – Il n’y a rien qui serait indicible, comme la douleur ou la jouissance, mais il y a une béance entre les univers linguistiques. Par exemple, Virginia Woolf parvient à déployer entièrement son univers avec des répétitions fréquentes (think, say, walk, room). Mais quand je la traduis, si je répète exactement comme elle fait, la langue française résiste : le français ne tolère pas la répétition à ce point. Je dois donc parfois couper (think, say) ou varier (marcher, se promener ; pièce, lieu). Et pour Joyce, je dois trouver des équivalents plus souvent que des traductions littérales. Je peux donc sentir et expérimenter l’espace entre les langues, je peux presque me promener dedans. C’est très dynamique, poétiquement. C’est aussi dans cet espace que l’inconscient devient quasi palpable : il procède par agglomération d’images, par jeux de mots, et aussi, je crois, sans mots : par images visuelles, par sensations, par sons…

J’aime beaucoup traduire : c’est comme tricoter. Ça me détend. Tout le matériau est déjà là, il ne reste plus qu’à dévider la pelote selon une nouvelle langue. A la fin de la journée, on est sûre d’avoir un bout du pull. Alors que quand on écrit, rien n’est sûr. Il faut tout sortir de soi. La pelote n’existe pas avant. C’est épuisant - et exaltant. 

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Je ne sais pas si je peux poser une question personnelle, mais de quoi rêvez-vous? Avez-vous des rêves particuliers qui reviennent?

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

De quoi nous parlent nos rêves ? Ils nous parlent de nos désirs. Ou de ce qui nous fait vraiment peur. De la vague qui nous emporterait. Un jour, en rêve, quelqu’un m’a dit (nous étions en voiture, nous longions la mer, un ras de marée venait) : « si tu es seule à voir cette vague, c’est qu’elle n’est que pour toi ». Pendant des années, j’ai rêvé de ces vagues qui venaient.

Les rêves nous arrivent, comme des lettres, et comme des événements. Ils nous arrivent en vrai. Il y a une réalité des rêves, mais nous les oublions, comme on oublie la présence réelle des étoiles et des trous noirs ou la présence réelle, en ce moment, des animaux sauvages, du pangolin qui creuse dans la forêt du Congo. Walter Benjamin fait un rêve, en 1940, au camp de Nevers où il est emprisonné. Et ce rêve, qu’il écrit à une amie, est « la seule chose belle » qui lui soit arrivée depuis longtemps. Benjamin marche dans la forêt. Au bout de la forêt il y a « trois ou quatre très belles femmes ». Et un piano. Et le vieux chapeau de son père. Et une fente rouge au chapeau. Une des belles femmes lui ouvre son lit. Et il écrit de la poésie. Au réveil, « de bonheur » il ne peut pas se rendormir.

Charlotte Beradt est une psychiatre qui a noté les rêves de ses patients sous le IIIème Reich. « Il est interdit de rêver et pourtant je rêve » : voilà le même rêve fait, en 1933, par six patients différents. La lutte s’imagine et se construit jusque dans les rêves.

 Et Sam Francis, l’immense peintre américain, a dit un autre jour (en 1982) : « Il n’y a qu’un seul rêve par nuit ». Je ne sais pas exactement que cette phrase signifie. Mais elle a la force poétique des rêves. Est-ce que tous les rêves dans la nuit tournante du monde sont, en une seule rotation, finalement le même rêve, le même mythe, la même image ?

Ou sept milliards de rêves et de cauchemars ? Je ne sais pas.

Peut-être oublie-t-on les rêves, les étoiles et les animaux sauvages parce qu’ils sont l’incontrôlable. Le non-domesticable.

Et la Terre elle-même n’est ni au centre du monde, ni au centre du système solaire. De se découvrir excentrés, les humains en ont conçu du ressentiment, une blessure narcissique (voir le traitement qu’ils ont fait subir à Galilée). Et la Terre n’est pas même au centre de la Voie Lactée : elle vogue à sa périphérie. Ce qui explique pourquoi la Voie Lactée – en forme de spirale comme beaucoup de galaxies – a, vue de la Terre, l’allure d’un ruban : parce qu’on la voit par le bord, par la tranche. Nous vivons en banlieue de l’univers.

Je passe une grande part de l’écriture à me demander où est le centre du monde, et ce qu’on fait quand on ne fait rien. Il me semble que les deux angoisses, ou les deux rêveries, ont quelque chose à voir.

En tous cas, j’écris après de longues phases de rêve éveillé. Les rêves « endormis » m’ont rarement inspirée, sauf en termes de flashes, d’images. Sinon leur narration est trop saccadée. Mais je rêve éveillée mes romans à venir, en marchant, en nageant, en ne faisant « rien ». Puis, à un moment, la première phrase vient et je peux commencer à écrire. Je n’ai pas fait de plan à proprement parler, mais le livre est prêt dans ma tête, il n’a plus qu’à se déployer en phrases ; et ça reste, bien sûr, un énorme travail.

 

THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Pourquoi êtes-vous devenu un écrivain?

 

DARRIEUSSECQ

Je suis devenue écrivain parce que dans ma famille ce n’étaient pas seulement les rêves, les étoiles et les animaux sauvages, qu’on passait sous silence, mais tout. Il y a deux choses surtout qu’on cache aux enfants : la mort et le sexe. Les zones du grand secret. Chez moi, la présence d’un enfant mort réunissait ces deux zones d’une façon dramatique. Ce chagrin silencieux de mes parents, et la folie de plusieurs personnes dans ma famille, ont déterminé l’écrivain que je suis. La famille est précisément la structure du secret, la structure faite pour le secret. Je ne « crois » pas aux fantômes, mais je pense que la littérature donne voix aux spectres, et qu’elle est une sorte de désertion merveilleuse des familles – de la famille archaïque, première. Ecrire n’a jamais empêché d’avoir des enfants. Je dirais même que d’une certaine façon, mes enfants me sauvent de l’écriture – ils la cadrent, ils la maintiennent relativement dans des horaires et un certain espace mental. Sinon elle me dévorerait et je ne vivrais qu’entourée de fantômes et de rêves, à lire et écrire sans cesse.

With special thanks to Olivia Reulier for translation assistance and Dominique Carlini Versini for her insights.